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Francois de La Rochefoucauld's Quotes

Francois de La Rochefoucauld profile photo

Born: 1970-01-01
Profession: Writer
Nation: French
Biography of Francois de La Rochefoucauld

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What makes the pain we feel from shame and jealousy so cutting is that vanity can give us no assistance in bearing them.

Tags: Give, Jealousy, Pain

The only thing that should surprise us is that there are still some things that can surprise us.

Tags: Surprise

We are more interested in making others believe we are happy than in trying to be happy ourselves.

Tags: Happy, Others, Trying

If we judge love by most of its effects, it resembles rather hatred than affection.

Tags: Hatred, Judge, Love

When a man must force himself to be faithful in his love, this is hardly better than unfaithfulness.

Tags: Faithful, Himself, Love

The force we use on ourselves, to prevent ourselves from loving, is often more cruel than the severest treatment at the hands of one loved.

Tags: Loved, Often, Ourselves

The more one loves a mistress, the more one is ready to hate her.

Tags: Hate, Her, Mistress

One can find women who have never had one love affair, but it is rare indeed to find any who have had only one.

Tags: Affair, Love, Women

The sure mark of one born with noble qualities is being born without envy.

Tags: Born, Envy, Sure

It is from a weakness and smallness of mind that men are opinionated; and we are very loath to believe what we are not able to comprehend.

Tags: Able, Men, Mind

In love we often doubt what we most believe.

Tags: Doubt, Love, Often

We are never so ridiculous through what we are as through what we pretend to be.

Tags: Pretend, Ridiculous

Flattery is a kind of bad money, to which our vanity gives us currency.

Tags: Bad, Money, Vanity

When we are in love we often doubt that which we most believe.

Tags: Doubt, Love, Often

All the passions make us commit faults; love makes us commit the most ridiculous ones.

Tags: Love, Makes, Ridiculous

Funeral pomp is more for the vanity of the living than for the honor of the dead.

Tags: Dead, Honor, Living

The heart is forever making the head its fool.

Tags: Fool, Heart, Making

It is a great act of cleverness to be able to conceal one's being clever.

Tags: Able, Act, Great

There are bad people who would be less dangerous if they were quite devoid of goodness.

Tags: Bad, Dangerous, Less

As one grows older, one becomes wiser and more foolish.

Tags: Foolish, Older, Wiser

Quarrels would not last long if the fault was only on one side.

Tags: Fault, Last, Side

What seems to be generosity is often no more than disguised ambition, which overlooks a small interest in order to secure a great one.

Tags: Ambition, Great, Small

Our aversion to lying is commonly a secret ambition to make what we say considerable, and have every word received with a religious respect.

Tags: Ambition, Respect, Secret
Much more quotes by Francois de La Rochefoucauld below the page.

Perfect behavior is born of complete indifference.

Tags: Behavior, Born, Perfect

The intellect is always fooled by the heart.

Tags: Fooled, Heart, Intellect

Not all those who know their minds know their hearts as well.

Tags: Hearts, Minds

The surest way to be deceived is to consider oneself cleverer than others.

Tags: Consider, Deceived, Others

If we had no faults of our own, we should not take so much pleasure in noticing those in others.

Tags: Faults, Others, Pleasure

It is often laziness and timidity that keep us within our duty while virtue gets all the credit.

Tags: Keep, Often, While

The principal point of cleverness is to know how to value things just as they deserve.

Tags: Deserve, Point, Value

Gratitude is merely the secret hope of further favors.

Tags: Gratitude, Hope, Secret

If we are to judge of love by its consequences, it more nearly resembles hatred than friendship.

Tags: Friendship, Judge, Love

It is almost always a fault of one who loves not to realize when he ceases to be loved.

Tags: Almost, Loved, Realize

A refusal of praise is a desire to be praised twice.

Tags: Desire, Praise, Twice

Most people know no other way of judging men's worth but by the vogue they are in, or the fortunes they have met with.

Tags: Judging, Men, Worth

Never give anyone the advice to buy or sell shares, because the most benevolent price of advice can turn out badly.

Tags: Advice, Anyone, Give

The happiness and misery of men depend no less on temper than fortune.

Tags: Happiness, Less, Men

We promise in proportion to our hopes, and we deliver in proportion to our fears.

Tags: Fears, Hopes, Promise

Decency is the least of all laws, but yet it is the law which is most strictly observed.

Tags: Decency, Law, Laws

However greatly we distrust the sincerity of those we converse with, yet still we think they tell more truth to us than to anyone else.

Tags: Else, Tell, Truth

It is not enough to have great qualities; We should also have the management of them.

Tags: Enough, Great, Management

People always complain about their memories, never about their minds.

Tags: Complain, Memories, Minds

Those who occupy their minds with small matters, generally become incapable of greatness.

Tags: Become, Minds, Small

Virtue would go far if vanity did not keep it company.

Tags: Company, Far, Keep

We have no patience with other people's vanity because it is offensive to our own.

Tags: Offensive, Patience, Vanity

You can find women who have never had an affair, but it is hard to find a woman who has had just one.

Tags: Hard, Woman, Women

Good advice is something a man gives when he is too old to set a bad example.

Tags: Advice, Bad, Good

If it were not for the company of fools, a witty man would often be greatly at a loss.

Tags: Company, Loss, Often

It is easier to appear worthy of a position one does not hold, than of the office which one fills.

Tags: Hold, Office, Position

Men often pass from love to ambition, but they seldom come back again from ambition to love.

Tags: Again, Love, Men

Repentance is not so much remorse for what we have done as the fear of the consequences.

Tags: Done, Fear, Repentance

The desire of talking of ourselves, and showing those faults we do not mind having seen, makes up a good part of our sincerity.

Tags: Good, Makes, Mind

The reason why so few people are agreeable in conversation is that each is thinking more about what he intends to say than others are saying.

Tags: Saying, Thinking, Why

There are few virtuous women who are not bored with their trade.

Tags: Bored, Few, Women

We would frequently be ashamed of our good deeds if people saw all of the motives that produced them.

Tags: Ashamed, Deeds, Good

A great many men's gratitude is nothing but a secret desire to hook in more valuable kindnesses hereafter.

Tags: Gratitude, Great, Men

Innocence does not find near so much protection as guilt.

Tags: Guilt, Innocence, Protection

People's personalities, like buildings, have various facades, some pleasant to view, some not.

Tags: Buildings, Pleasant, View

Silence is the safest course for any man to adopt who distrust himself.

Tags: Distrust, Himself, Silence

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore.

Tags: Cannot, Forgive, Often

Before we set our hearts too much upon anything, let us examine how happy they are, who already possess it.

Tags: Happy, Hearts, Possess

Being a blockhead is sometimes the best security against being cheated by a man of wit.

Tags: Against, Best, Sometimes

Everyone complains of his memory, and nobody complains of his judgment.

Tags: Everyone, Memory, Nobody

However glorious an action in itself, it ought not to pass for great if it be not the effect of wisdom and intention.

Tags: Action, Great, Wisdom

In friendship as well as love, ignorance very often contributes more to our happiness than knowledge.

Tags: Friendship, Happiness, Love

No man is clever enough to know all the evil he does.

Tags: Clever, Enough, Evil

The sure way to be cheated is to think one's self more cunning than others.

Tags: Others, Self, Sure

They that apply themselves to trifling matters commonly become incapable of great ones.

Tags: Become, Great, Themselves

We always get bored with those whom we bore.

Tags: Bore, Bored, Whom

When a man is in love, he doubts, very often, what he most firmly believes.

Tags: Believes, Love, Often

Politeness is a desire to be treated politely, and to be esteemed polite oneself.

Tags: Desire, Oneself, Treated

There is no better proof of a man's being truly good than his desiring to be constantly under the observation of good men.

Tags: Good, Men, Truly

We get so much in the habit of wearing disguises before others that we finally appear disguised before ourselves.

Tags: Finally, Others, Ourselves

Gracefulness is to the body what understanding is to the mind.

Tags: Body, Mind

If we did not flatter ourselves, the flattery of others could never harm us.

Tags: Harm, Others, Ourselves

In the misfortunes of our best friends we always find something not altogether displeasing to us.

Tags: Altogether, Best, Friends

The mind cannot long play the heart's role.

Tags: Cannot, Heart, Mind

To achieve greatness one should live as if they will never die.

Tags: Achieve, Die, Greatness

Weakness of character is the only defect which cannot be amended.

Tags: Cannot, Character, Weakness

It's the height of folly to want to be the only wise one.

Tags: Folly, Height, Wise

We are very far from always knowing our own wishes.

Tags: Far, Knowing, Wishes

We promise according to our hopes and perform according to our fears.

Tags: Fears, Hopes, Promise

Hope, deceiving as it is, serves at least to lead us to the end of our lives by an agreeable route.

Tags: End, Hope, Lives

How can we expect another to keep our secret if we have been unable to keep it ourselves?

Tags: Another, Keep, Secret

Pride does not wish to owe and vanity does not wish to pay.

Tags: Pay, Pride, Wish

We come altogether fresh and raw into the several stages of life, and often find ourselves without experience, despite our years.

Tags: Experience, Life, Often

We say little, when vanity does not make us speak.

Tags: Speak, Vanity

On neither the sun, nor death, can a man look fixedly.

Tags: Death, Nor, Sun

Some counterfeits reproduce so very well the truth that it would be a flaw of judgment not to be deceived by them.

Tags: Deceived, Judgment, Truth

Why is it that our memory is good enough to retain the least triviality that happens to us, and yet not good enough to recollect how often we have told it to the same person?

Tags: Enough, Good, Why

Old people love to give good advice; it compensates them for their inability to set a bad example.

Tags: Bad, Good, Love

Some accidents there are in life that a little folly is necessary to help us out of.

Tags: Help, Life, Necessary

The desire to seem clever often keeps us from being so.

Tags: Desire, Often, Seem

There is a kind of elevation which does not depend on fortune; it is a certain air which distinguishes us, and seems to destine us for great things; it is a price which we imperceptibly set upon ourselves.

Tags: Great, Ourselves, Seems

If we have not peace within ourselves, it is in vain to seek it from outward sources.

Tags: Ourselves, Peace, Within

Only the contemptible fear contempt.

Tags: Contempt, Fear

Perfect courage is to do without witnesses what one would be capable of doing with the world looking on.

Tags: Courage, Looking, Perfect

There are but very few men clever enough to know all the mischief they do.

Tags: Enough, Few, Men

We always love those who admire us, but we do not always love those whom we admire.

Tags: Admire, Love, Whom

There are various sorts of curiosity; one is from interest, which makes us desire to know that which may be useful to us; and the other, from pride which comes from the wish to know what others are ignorant of.

Tags: May, Others, Wish